Resources & Services

 

 

After Your Surgery

After surgery
  • You will be brought to the Recovery Room.
  • You have the right to have your pain evaluated and treated. Your nurse will ask you about your pain level on a scale from 0-10, with 10 being the most severe.
  • Your nurse will give you medicine to relieve the pain.
  • Tell your nurse if you feel sick or need help of any kind.
  • Your nurse will give you written instructions you must follow after your surgery. A member of your family, a guardian or friend may be present to hear the instructions.
  • You are advised to have an adult stay with you for 24 hours after surgery.
After you leave the hospital
  • Your Recovery Room nurse will call you the day after you go home to see how you are feeling.
  • Please call your surgeon at any time about any problems or questions you have at 354-5400.
Keeping your lungs clear after surgery - breathing & coughing exercises

Taking a deep breath and coughing every 2 hours after surgery helps to keep your lungs clear and prevent breathing problems. Even if you are told not to cough, you DO need to do deep breathing exercises every 2 hours.

Deep breathing instructions

  1. First, you will sit up as far as the nurse tells you, BUT BEFORE YOU SIT UP, if you have had surgery on your stomach area or chest, hold a pillow tightly over the area where the stitches are.
  2. Breathe in deeply through your nose and mouth and hold this breath for 3 seconds.
  3. Move your lips as though you are going to whistle and let the air out through your nose and mouth at the same time.
  4. Repeat this 5 more times.

If your caregiver tells you to cough, after the 5th deep breath, you should do the following coughing exercise:

  • Still sitting up, with the pillow still against your stitches if you need it, lean forward a little and with your mouth open, take in a deep breath. Place a tissue over your mouth to catch anything you cough up, then quickly give 1 or 2 strong coughs from deep in your lungs.
  • Repeat the steps 2 more times.

Deep breathing instructions using a breathing exerciser

Taking a deep breath and coughing every 2 hours after surgery helps to keep your lungs clear and prevent breathing problems. Even if you are told not to cough, you DO need to do deep breathing exercises every 2 hours.

  1. First, you will sit up as far as the nurse tells you, BUT BEFORE YOU SIT UP, if you have had surgery on your stomach area or chest, hold a pillow tightly over the area where the stitches are.
  2. Slide the yellow pointer on the left side of the breating exerciser to the volume level that your caregiver tells you to use.
  3. Keep the breathing exerciser in an upright position. You can hold it or place it on a table.
  4. Breathe out normally. Put the mouthpiece in your mouth, with your lips closed around it tightly.
  5. Breathe in slowly. This raises the piston in the clear chamber of the breathing exerciser.
  6. Continue to breathe in, and try to raise the piston to the set volume level. Read the level of the volume at the top of the piston.
  7. When you are finished breathing in, take the mouthpiece out of your mouth and hold your breath as long as you can.
  8. Breathe out normally and let the piston go back to the bottom of the chamber.

If your caregiver tells you to cough, after breathing out, you should do the following coughing exercise:

  • Still sitting up, with the pillow still against your stitches if you need it, lean forward a little and with your mouth open, take in a deep breath. Place a tissue over your mouth to catch anything you cough up, then quickly give 1 or 2 strong coughs from deep in your lungs.
  • Repeat the steps 15 times every 1 - 2 hours.

Secondhand smoke in the air you breathe can cause serious health problems

  • Secondhand smoke - from cigarettes, cigars and pipes - can cause serious health problems, not only for smokers, but for nonsmokers, too.
  • Secondhand smoke can make asthma worse, causing more frequent and more severe attacks.
  • Exposure to secondhand smoke on a daily basis doubles the risk of having a heart attack. Each year 37,000 people die from heart disease caused by secondhand smoke.
  • Each year secondhand smoke causes approximately 3,000 cases of lung cancer in nonsmokers.
  • Secondhand smoke is especially dangerous for children. A baby has twice the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) if the mother, father or another caregiver smokes. Secondhand smoke causes ear infections in children. Secondhand smoke causes 150,000 to 300,000 cases of bronchitis and pneumonia in infants and young children each year.
  • Exposure to secondhand smoke and smoking while pregnant are both linked to miscarriage, low birth weight and stillbirth.
  • There is NO safe exposure to secondhand smoke. No filtration systems eliminate the danger caused by secondhand smoke.

For more information about how to protect yourself or loved ones from secondhand smoke, call (603) 354-5454 x2306.