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Atherectomy of a Coronary Artery

Option 1

Picture of a directional atherectomy device removing plaque
slide 1 of 3
    

A directional atherectomy device cuts away plaque, which is then collected in the tip of the device.

Option 2

Picture of a rotational cutting device removing plaque
slide 2 of 3
    

A rotational cutting device spins at a high speed and pulverizes plaque, which is then safely washed away in your bloodstream.

Option 3

Picture of a transluminal extraction device removing plaque
slide 3 of 3
    

A transluminal extraction device cuts away plaque using tiny rotating blades. The loose plaque is sucked into a tube through a vacuum.

By Healthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer Rakesh K. Pai, MD, FACC - Cardiology, Electrophysiology
Specialist Medical Reviewer Robert A. Kloner, MD, PhD - Cardiology
Last Revised April 5, 2012

Last Revised: April 5, 2012

Author: Healthwise Staff

Medical Review: Rakesh K. Pai, MD, FACC - Cardiology, Electrophysiology & Robert A. Kloner, MD, PhD - Cardiology

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