Learn Your Baby's Rhythms

Each baby is an individual with a unique temperament and general likes and dislikes. By responding to and reinforcing your baby's natural habits, you can help establish and maintain a predictable daily schedule.

Sleeping patterns

At first, babies move in and out of sleep in unpredictable patterns. By age 3 months, most babies establish more of a routine and sleep for longer periods, perhaps through the night. They are also more alert when awake and you can gradually add time between feedings.

At about 3 to 4 months, start bedtime rituals to help your baby relax. Read a story, play quiet music, sing, rock your baby, or give him or her a gentle massage. Avoid loud music or sounds and bright lights.

Sleep patterns often change during the second half of the first year. To promote a regular schedule, maintain your routines when your baby resists going down for a nap or going to bed at the usual time.

Feeding schedules

Parents often wonder whether their baby is getting enough nourishment. The quality and quantity of a baby's feedings probably are sufficient if the baby is gaining weight steadily, is content most of the time, and is becoming increasingly alert and active.

By 2 months of age, most babies have established regular feeding schedules. Bottle-fed babies tend to eat about every 3 to 4 hours, and breastfed babies nurse more frequently. Many babies begin eating less frequently at night.

At 3 to 4 months, when babies become interested in the world around them, feeding times may become frustrating for parents. Babies often interrupt feedings by looking around, smiling, cooing, and reaching for a parent's face. This is a normal attempt to turn feeding times into a more social event and an opportune time for parents to interact with their babies. It may help to feed your baby in a quiet and dimly lit room.

Babies do not need solid foods until they are about 6 months old. Some babies may be ready for solid foods at 4 or 5 months. Ask your doctor when you can start feeding your baby solid foods. Adding cereal to your baby's bottle will not make him or her sleep through the night.

ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer Susan C. Kim, MD - Pediatrics
John Pope, MD - Pediatrics
Specialist Medical Reviewer Louis Pellegrino, MD - Developmental Pediatrics

Current as ofApril 27, 2015