Signs That Your Baby Is Getting Enough Breast Milk

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Topic Overview

You can be reassured that your baby is eating enough and is well nourished when he or she:

  • Shows an eager desire and wakes up frequently to breastfeed.
  • Rhythmically sucks and swallows milk. The fronts of your baby's ears will move slightly, and you usually will hear swallows.
  • Breastfeeds at least 15 to 20 minutes on each breast at each feeding and is content when finished.
  • Feeds at least every 1 to 3 hours during the first 2 months. Wake your newborn every 2 to 3 hours for a feeding during the first few weeks, if needed. After 2 months, your baby will be able to empty the breast more quickly. Feedings will then occur less often and take less time.
  • Has regular dirty and wet diapers.
    • During the first few days of life, breastfed newborns have about 3 wet diapers a day. After that, they have 6 or more wet diapers a day throughout the first month of life. The number of diapers a baby wets is sometimes hard to know, because disposable diapers work so well at wicking moisture.
    • Breastfed babies usually have a small stool after every feeding for about the first 4 to 8 weeks. By the end of the first week, your baby may have as many as 5 to 10 stools a day. This number may go down as your baby eats more and matures during that first month. By 6 weeks of age, your baby may not have a bowel movement every day. This usually is not a problem, as long as the baby seems comfortable and is healthy and growing and as long as the stools are not hard.
  • Grows at a normal rate as judged by regular increases in weight, length, and head size. Your baby should appear healthy and happy with good muscle tone, healthy skin, and good color.

Most mothers become more confident that their babies are eating well after a few weeks of breastfeeding. It usually takes some time to establish a routine. You will learn to recognize and respond to your baby's feeding signals.

Other Places To Get Help

Organizations

La Leche League International
www.llli.org
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: Women's Health
www.hrsa.gov/womenshealth/index.html

Credits

ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer Sarah Marshall, MD - Family Medicine
Kathleen Romito, MD - Family Medicine
Specialist Medical Reviewer Mary Robbins, RNC, IBCLC - Lactation Consultant

Current as ofSeptember 29, 2015