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Acquired Hemophilia

National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

Important

It is possible that the main title of the report Acquired Hemophilia is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and disorder subdivision(s) covered by this report.

Synonyms

  • acquired hemophilia A (AHA)
  • acquired hemophilia B (AHB)

Disorder Subdivisions

  • None

General Discussion

Summary

Acquired hemophilia is a rare autoimmune disorder characterized by bleeding that occurs in patients with a personal and family history negative for hemorrhages. Autoimmune disorders occur when the body's immune system mistakenly attacks healthy cells or tissue. In acquired hemophilia, the body produces antibodies (known as inhibitors) that attack clotting factors, most often factor VIII. Clotting factors are specialized proteins required for the blood to clot normally. Consequently, affected individuals develop complications associated with abnormal, uncontrolled bleeding into the muscles, skin and soft tissue and during surgery or following trauma. Specific symptoms can include nosebleeds (epistaxis), bruising throughout the body, solid swellings of congealed blood (hematomas), blood in the urine (hematuria) and gastrointestinal or urogenital bleeding. Acquired hemophilia can potentially cause severe, life-threatening bleeding complications in severe cases. In approximately 50% of cases, there is an identifiable underlying clinical condition; in the other 50% no cause is known (idiopathic).



Introduction

Acquired hemophilia is different from congenital hemophilia, a group of rare genetic disorders caused by congenital deficiency of certain clotting factors. The main form of hemophilia is hemophilia A (classic hemophilia), which is an X-linked disorder that fully affects males only. It is caused by deficiency or inactivation of factor VIII, the same clotting factor that is affected in most cases of acquired hemophilia. Although both disorders involve deficiency of the same clotting factor, the bleeding pattern is quite different. The reason the bleeding patterns differ between these disorders is not fully understood.

Resources

National Hemophilia Foundation

116 West 32nd Street, 11th Floor

New York, NY 10001

USA

Tel: (212)328-3700

Fax: (212)328-3777

Tel: (800)424-2634

Email: handi@hemophilia.org

Internet: http://www.hemophilia.org



Canadian Hemophilia Society

400-1255 University Street

Montreal

Quebec, H3B 3B6

Canada

Tel: 5148480503

Fax: 5148489661

Tel: 8006682686

Email: chs@hemophilia.ca

Internet: http://www.hemophilia.ca



NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

P.O. Box 30105

Bethesda, MD 20892-0105

Tel: (301)592-8573

Fax: (301)251-1223

Email: nhlbiinfo@rover.nhlbi.nih.gov

Internet: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/



World Federation of Hemophilia

1425 René Lévesque Blvd. W. Suite 1010

Montreal

Quebec, H3G 1T7

Canada

Tel: 5148757944

Fax: 5148758916

Email: wfh@wfh.org

Internet: http://www.wfh.org/index.asp?lang=EN



Children's Cancer & Blood Foundation

333 East 38th Street, Suite 830

New York, NY 10016-2745

Tel: (212)297-4336

Fax: (212)297-4340

Email: info@childrenscbf.org

Internet: http://www.childrenscbf.org/



Hemophilia Federation of America

210 7th St. SE

Suite 200B

Washington, DC 20003

USA

Tel: (202)675-6984

Fax: (202)675-6983

Tel: (800)230-9797

Email: info@hemophiliafed.org

Internet: http://www.hemophiliafed.org



Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center

PO Box 8126

Gaithersburg, MD 20898-8126

Tel: (301)251-4925

Fax: (301)251-4911

Tel: (888)205-2311

TDD: (888)205-3223

Internet: http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/GARD/



Irish Haemophilia Society

First Floor

Cathedral Court

New Street

Dublin, 7

Ireland

Tel: 353016579900

Fax: 353016579901

Email: info@haemophilia.ie

Internet: http://www.haemophilia.ie/



For a Complete Report

This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be downloaded free from the NORD website for registered users. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational therapies (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, go to MyD-H, the Dartmouth-Hitchcock patient portal. You must be a registered MyD-H user for the Lebanon, Manchester, or Nashua locations to access this site.

The information provided in this report is not intended for diagnostic purposes. It is provided for informational purposes only. NORD recommends that affected individuals seek the advice or counsel of their own personal physicians.

It is possible that the title of this topic is not the name you selected. Please check the Synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and Disorder Subdivision(s) covered by this report

This disease entry is based upon medical information available through the date at the end of the topic. Since NORD's resources are limited, it is not possible to keep every entry in the Rare Disease Database completely current and accurate. Please check with the agencies listed in the Resources section for the most current information about this disorder.

For additional information and assistance about rare disorders, please contact the National Organization for Rare Disorders at P.O. Box 1968, Danbury, CT 06813-1968; phone (203) 744-0100; web site www.rarediseases.org or email orphan@rarediseases.org

Last Updated:  3/27/2012

Copyright  2012 National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

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